Santa Rosa California Birds Eye View Map - 1876

SantaRosa-1876-flat.jpg
santa-rosa-1876-detail.jpg
santa-rosa-warmwood-frame-white-mat.jpg
santa-rosa-warmwood-frame-off-white-mat.jpg
santa-rosa-warmwood-frame-no-mat.jpg
santa-rosa-silver-frame-white-mat.jpg
santa-rosa-silver-frame-off-white-mat.jpg
santa-rosa-silver-frame-no-mat.jpg
santa-rosa-black-frame-white-mat.jpg
santa-rosa-black-frame-off-white-mat.jpg
santa-rosa-black-frame-no-mat.jpg
SantaRosa-1876-flat.jpg
santa-rosa-1876-detail.jpg
santa-rosa-warmwood-frame-white-mat.jpg
santa-rosa-warmwood-frame-off-white-mat.jpg
santa-rosa-warmwood-frame-no-mat.jpg
santa-rosa-silver-frame-white-mat.jpg
santa-rosa-silver-frame-off-white-mat.jpg
santa-rosa-silver-frame-no-mat.jpg
santa-rosa-black-frame-white-mat.jpg
santa-rosa-black-frame-off-white-mat.jpg
santa-rosa-black-frame-no-mat.jpg

Santa Rosa California Birds Eye View Map - 1876

from 300.00

Birds Eye View of Santa Rosa, California from 1876.

Panoramic city maps, popular at the turn of the century, depicted U.S. towns from the perspective that came to be known as bird's-eye maps. These non-photographic old maps, depicted from oblique angles, showed street patterns, buildings and the predominant surrounding landscape in perspective. Going to great lengths to make these maps, artists would often climb surrounding hills or trees, sometimes even building platforms from which to achieve the "bird's eye" perspective. They also used to take rides in hot air balloons in order to get the proper perspective.

Click the image thumbnails to view frame and mat options.

Frame:
Print Size:
Mat:
Quantity:
Add To Cart


Bird's eye view, was a popular cartographic rendering used to depict cities and towns during the late 1800’s and early 1900’s. They show street patterns, individual buildings, and major landscape features in perspective. Preparation and sale of these maps were motivated by civic pride and the desire of the city fathers to encourage commercial growth. Going to great lengths to make these maps, artists would often climb surrounding hills or trees, sometimes even building platforms from which to achieve the "bird's eye" perspective. They also used to take rides in hot air balloons in order to get the proper perspective. To bolster sales of these old panoramic city maps, the artists would often choke town harbors full of ships, include proposed building developments and depict a vivacious, bustling industry.


Looking for more frame and mat options?

Shoot us a message and we will get you our full range of custom options.

Name *
Name
Phone
Phone
Preferred method of communication